My Brand Story. 


Hands stained with ink, loose paper sticking to my smudged fingertips. The minimalist practice of pen and paper, as written reflections shared the page with visual expression. These were my first tools as a young creative.

Ink and Pulp entered the world as a blog. It began as a creative outlet during grad school, where I could dive deeper into various interests while letting my writing move to whatever rhythm I was feeling. I'd been building my career path as an art historian, not fully considering the possibility of combining my art practice with my academic pursuits.

 

One day, I shuffled into an art supply store, 

 

I was in a remarkably unique MFA seminar with the artist Karthik Pandian, which turned out to be one of the most pivotal experiences of my career.

One of the most pivotal moments in my life was working under the guidance of the artist Karthik Pandian in an MFA seminar centered around creating art from found objects. I'd long ago traded in

 

If you’re familiar with my photography, you may notice there’s a visual flatness to my style. This is partially because I’m drawn to modern artists like Henri Matisse, Kazimir Malevich, and to some extent Mark Rothko, who challenged the traditional notion that art ought to reflect the natural world. It’s liberating to stand in front of a work of art and gently discard any intellectualization, just allowing yourself to experience whatever pure emotion is evoked from the colors and forms.

 

On a creative crusade in grad school, I shuffled into an art supply store, picked out paint colors that were calling my name, and came home to realize I’d uncovered a color palette that was channeling Tim Burton-meets-the-Easter-bunny in all its pastel glory. And that’s how the Ink and Pulp aesthetic was born. Sometimes you have to cover your eyes and allow that unexpected side of your personality to emerge – it often makes for the most interesting creative revelation.

was reincarnated as a Tumblr, and then eventually, as an Instagram feed.

 

 

So while Ink and Pulp originated with my love for pen and paper, it more significantly communicates my 'dichotomous' style of storytelling: I weave together word (ink) and image (pulp), inspiring genuine meaning through both.
 

The Aesthetic

On a creative crusade in grad school, I shuffled into an art supply store, picked out paint colors that were calling my name, and came home to realize I’d uncovered a color palette that was channeling Tim Burton-meets-the-Easter-bunny in all its pastel glory. And that’s how the Ink and Pulp aesthetic was born. Sometimes you have to cover your eyes and allow that unexpected side of your personality to emerge – it often makes for the most interesting creative revelation.

If you’re familiar with my photography, you may notice there’s a visual flatness to my style. This is partially because I’m drawn to modern artists like Henri Matisse, Kazimir Malevich, and to some extent Mark Rothko, who challenged the traditional notion that art ought to reflect the natural world. It’s liberating to stand in front of a work of art and gently discard any intellectualization, just allowing yourself to experience whatever pure emotion is evoked from the colors and forms. Over the years, I’ve continued exploring the relationship between visual language and the viewing public. While pursuing my Master’s degree at the University of Chicago, I focused on the way people respond to and interact with public art in their everyday spaces. Today, I work with brands and entrepreneurs on constructing a cohesive visual narrative that genuinely communicates who they are and why that matters. 

 

The name

"Ink and Pulp" is rooted in my love for pen and paper, my first tools as a young creative. It has since evolved to somewhat abstractly define what I do: I communicate meaning through word (ink) and image (pulp). 

 

The History

 

It later evolved into a personal experiment for me to apply my content strategies that were getting shut down at my job. I wanted to take my knowledge and intuition about effective online storytelling and see what would happen. Four years later, my community has grown to over 50k people and I’ve worked on content marketing campaigns with influential brands like J.Crew, Everlane, Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants, and Nespresso USA. I’ve built and grown two creative businesses, designed and led a women's wellness retreat, and I host workshops and coaching sessions centered around guiding professional women in reigniting their creativity.